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Neighborhoods

Harlem

Harlem and Central Harlem is located west of Fifth Avenue and the East River and stretches from 110th Street, or Central Park North, to 155th Street.

Harlem has long been defined by boom-and-bust cycles and dramatic population shifts. In the 1920s and 1930s, the neighborhood was the center of the first Harlem Renaissance, a cultural high point in the history of the American black community. In the late part of the 20th century, Harlem experienced a massive building boom. Newer buildings range in size and style from studios to lofts and luxury condos. Harlem boasts many of the finest original townhouses in New York. 

There are a growing number of shopping options on 125th Street, and in addition to Central Park, Marcus Garvey Park offers twenty acres of play-space, concerts and events like the City's Charlie Parker Jazz Festival between 120th and 124th Streets. Iconic venues like the Apollo Theater draw visitors from around the world. The New York Times recently reported that the population of "Greater Harlem" had grown more since 2000 former U.S. President Bill Clinton moved into his Harlem office in 2001 than in any decade since the 1940s. 

Harlem's newest population is refreshingly diverse, made up of residents who enjoy the neighborhood's history, the gorgeous homes and unrenovated gems, oozing with potential. Subways include the 6 for East Harlem; the 2 or 3 for Central Harlem; and the A, B, C, or D for West Harlem.

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